How to Get Luxury Windows at a Fraction of the Cost | Erie Insurance

Luxury windows are typically an addition people cannot afford early on in their life as a homeowner. Replacing an entire home’s worth of windows with high-quality windows is an investment, often requiring many years of saving.

But you don’t have to wait. There are a number of ways homeowners can update their windows with a luxurious look without having to take out a loan or spend thousands of dollars to get the desired look. Here are a few easy steps to take to update your windows and save your wallet.

Insert grids

Adding grids into your windows give them a dimensional, higher quality look. But you don’t have to replace the entire window anymore if your windows didn’t come with grids. Once you decide on what style of window grid you want (and there are several options), you can purchase custom-made inserts or even make them yourself.

To DIY, measure the layout of the window and then measure out the pattern for the grids you wish to insert. Assemble the necessary tools and supplies. You can cut thin strips of PVC into grids with a simple miter saw. Once the strips are cut to length, apply double-sided adhesive and lay the grids out across the window panes. Not only will this dress up your existing windows, it will give them a classic look both inside and out.

Install shades

Adding window shades can benefit your windows twofold. First, they can help to insulate the windows and the living space from extreme shifts in temperature and help slow furniture fading from sunlight in the home. Second, they can add a smooth, clean, updated look to the window at a fraction of the cost of installing all new windows.

Window shades come in a variety of options that can add a luxurious look to your old windows: Roman shades, woven wood shades, cellular shades and roller shades all provide an element of sleek sophistication and polish off the look of your windows. Available in a multitude of opacities, colors and prints, shades can be customized to fit the look of the décor in your home.

Upgrade the trim

Updating the trim work around the window is a bit more involved, but it can increase the look and value of your windows and is cheaper than replacing the entire window. Adding new wood, painting the frames, or updating the type of beveling in the trim itself can give the look of luxury. If you aren’t comfortable with carpentry, you may want to hire a contractor to take care of this update.

Any of these techniques can change the look of your windows without having to spend thousands to upgrade them. All of these changes together can improve the value of the home itself.

And make sure your home is adequately protected. Talk to an Erie Insurance Agent about homeowners coverage or to get a quote.

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Katie Laird is the director of Social Marketing for Blinds.com and a passionate home decorator. She has a love of all things Mid-Century Modern and blue. Blinds.com carries a wide selection of window shades to help keep privacy in your home.

 

Source: How to Get Luxury Windows at a Fraction of the Cost | Erie Insurance

Erie Insurance Custom Collection Auto Services Program

Being an auto service provider means you’re committed to providing your customers – and their cars – with reliable, quality service. With the Erie Insurance Custom Collection Auto Services Program you can count on ERIE and your agent to protect the business you’ve worked so hard to build. Contact me to learn more, (317) 420-2867. Or Visit us on line at Scott Lynch Agency

Memorial Day

Memorial Day Meaning – Reagan’s Speech
President Ronald Reagan is credited with reviving the practice of honoring Memorial Day and its meaning. One of his famous speeches was given at Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day in 1986.

“Today is the day we put aside to remember fallen heroes and to pray that no heroes will ever have to die for us again. It’s a day of thanks for the valor of others, a day to remember the splendor of America and those of her children who rest in this cemetery and others. It’s a day to be with the family and remember.

“I was thinking this morning that across the country children and their parents will be going to the town parade and the young ones will sit on the sidewalks and wave their flags as the band goes by. Later, maybe, they’ll have a cookout or a day at the beach. And that’s good, because today is a day to be with the family and to remember.

“Arlington, this place of so many memories, is a fitting place for some remembering. So many wonderful men and women rest here, men and women who led colorful, vivid, and passionate lives. There are the greats of the military: Bull Halsey and the Admirals Leahy, father and son; Black Jack Pershing; and the GI’s general, Omar Bradley. Great men all, military men. But there are others here known for other things.

“Here in Arlington rests a sharecropper’s son who became a hero to a lonely people. Joe Louis came from nowhere, but he knew how to fight. And he galvanized a nation in the days after Pearl Harbor when he put on the uniform of his country and said, ‘I know we’ll win because we’re on God’s side.’ Audie Murphy is here, Audie Murphy of the wild, wild courage. For what else would you call it when a man bounds to the top of a disabled tank, stops an enemy advance, saves lives, and rallies his men, and all of it single-handedly. When he radioed for artillery support and was asked how close the enemy was to his position, he said, ‘Wait a minute and I’ll let you speak to them.’ [Laughter]

“Michael Smith is here, and Dick Scobee, both of the space shuttle Challenger. Their courage wasn’t wild, but thoughtful, the mature and measured courage of career professionals who took prudent risks for great reward—in their case, to advance the sum total of knowledge in the world. They’re only the latest to rest here; they join other great explorers with names like Grissom and Chaffee.

“Oliver Wendell Holmes is here, the great jurist and fighter for the right. A poet searching for an image of true majesty could not rest until he seized on ‘Holmes dissenting in a sordid age.’ Young Holmes served in the Civil War. He might have been thinking of the crosses and stars of Arlington when he wrote: ‘At the grave of a hero we end, not with sorrow at the inevitable loss, but with the contagion of his courage; and with a kind of desperate joy we go back to the fight.’

“All of these men were different, but they shared this in common: They loved America very much. There was nothing they wouldn’t do for her. And they loved with the sureness of the young. It’s hard not to think of the young in a place like this, for it’s the young who do the fighting and dying when a peace fails and a war begins. Not far from here is the statue of the three servicemen—the three fighting boys of Vietnam. It, too, has majesty and more. Perhaps you’ve seen it—three rough boys walking together, looking ahead with a steady gaze. There’s something wounded about them, a kind of resigned toughness. But there’s an unexpected tenderness, too. At first you don’t really notice, but then you see it. The three are touching each other, as if they’re supporting each other, helping each other on.

“I know that many veterans of Vietnam will gather today, some of them perhaps by the wall. And they’re still helping each other on. They were quite a group, the boys of Vietnam—boys who fought a terrible and vicious war without enough support from home, boys who were dodging bullets while we debated the efficacy of the battle. It was often our poor who fought in that war; it was the unpampered boys of the working class who picked up the rifles and went on the march. They learned not to rely on us; they learned to rely on each other. And they were special in another way: They chose to be faithful. They chose to reject the fashionable skepticism of their time. They chose to believe and answer the call of duty. They had the wild, wild courage of youth. They seized certainty from the heart of an ambivalent age; they stood for something.

“And we owe them something, those boys. We owe them first a promise: That just as they did not forget their missing comrades, neither, ever, will we. And there are other promises. We must always remember that peace is a fragile thing that needs constant vigilance. We owe them a promise to look at the world with a steady gaze and, perhaps, a resigned toughness, knowing that we have adversaries in the world and challenges and the only way to meet them and maintain the peace is by staying strong.

“That, of course, is the lesson of this century, a lesson learned in the Sudetenland, in Poland, in Hungary, in Czechoslovakia, in Cambodia. If we really care about peace, we must stay strong. If we really care about peace, we must, through our strength, demonstrate our unwillingness to accept an ending of the peace. We must be strong enough to create peace where it does not exist and strong enough to protect it where it does. That’s the lesson of this century and, I think, of this day. And that’s all I wanted to say. The rest of my contribution is to leave this great place to its peace, a peace it has earned.

“Thank all of you, and God bless you, and have a day full of memories.”

Original Article

Learning to Thrive to Honor Our Parents’ Memory

New: James lost both parents. His story shows the incredible power of having some life insurance, or none at all.

Congratulations on your new apartment!

Whether you are moving to town for a new job or just moving out on your own after graduation – we have the renter’s insurance policy for you. Call us at (317) 420-2867 to discuss our Indiana Renter’s Policy and how it will protect you. You can also visit us on line at Scott Lynch Agency. Don’t forget to ask about our other great policies!

Employee or Independent Contractor? Know the Rules

IRS Small Business Week Tax Tip 2017-02, May 1, 2017

The IRS encourages all businesses and business owners to know the rules when it comes to classifying a worker as an employee or an independent contractor.

An employer must withhold income taxes and pay Social Security, Medicare taxes and unemployment tax on wages paid to an employee. Employers normally do not have to withhold or pay any taxes on payments to independent contractors.

Here are two key points for small business owners to keep in mind when it comes to classifying workers:

  1. Control. The relationship between a worker and a business is important. If the business controls what work is accomplished and directs how it is done, it exerts behavioral control. If the business directs or controls financial and certain relevant aspects of a worker’s job, it exercises financial control. This includes:
    • The extent of the worker’s investment in the facilities or tools used in performing services
    • The extent to which the worker makes his or her services available to the relevant market
    • How the business pays the worker, and
    • The extent to which the worker can realize a profit or incur a loss
  2. Relationship. How the employer and worker perceive their relationship is also important for determining worker status. Key topics to think about include:
    • Written contracts describing the relationship the parties intended to create
    • Whether the business provides the worker with employee-type benefits, such as insurance, a pension plan, vacation or sick pay
    • The permanency of the relationship, and
    • The extent to which services performed by the worker are a key aspect of the regular business of the company
    • The extent to which the worker has unreimbursed business expenses

The IRS can help employers determine the status of their workers by using form Form SS-8, Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding. IRS Publication 15-A, Employer’s Supplemental Tax Guide, is also an excellent resource.

Original Article