Get a free quote

s1717_get_a_quote_fb_ad

Whatever your regrets in life, your insurance shouldn’t be one of them. Contact me for a no regrets quote from Erie Insurance today. Personalized Get a Quote or call (317) 420-2867.

Add up the savings

Add up the savings
Do the math on ERIE’s multi-policy discount.

Get your quote HERE or call us at (317) 420-2867.

7 monthly bills affected by your credit rating

Brian Acton, Credit.com Published 4:02 p.m. ET June 1, 2017 | Updated 4:02 p.m. ET June 1, 2017

You probably know your monthly bills can impact your credit, as late payments or accounts in collections can land on your credit report and bring down your credit score. But are you aware your credit score can affect the payment amount on a number of your monthly bills?

Here are seven monthly bills with payments your credit score can determine.

1. Rent payments

When you apply for a lease, your landlord might request a background check that includes your credit report. They can’t run a background check without your permission, although refusing may prevent you from moving forward with the lease.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the landlord can take adverse action if they find red flags in your credit report. This action could include denying your rental application or raising your rent higher than they would charge another applicant. The good news is they are legally required to give you written notice if they take adverse action, provide you the report they used (if you request it within 60 days) and give you the chance to dispute the information.

2. Credit cards

Consumers with good credit tend to qualify for much lower credit card interest rates than those with poor credit. Interest is applied to your credit card balance each month unless you pay it off in full within the monthly grace period. (You can go here to learn more about how credit card interest is calculated.) If you tend to carry a balance month to month, your poor credit could be costing you extra in interest.

3. Mortgages

Your mortgage payment is also directly affected by your credit. Mortgage lenders consider you a riskier borrower if you have a lower credit score. To hedge against that risk, they will charge you a higher interest rate.

4. Auto loans

Credit scores impact the interest rate lenders offer when you apply for an auto loan. While interest rates vary between lenders, having excellent credit generally results in lower interest and a lower monthly payment. Those 0% financing offers you see on car commercials usually require excellent credit.

Your credit score doesn’t generally affect federal loan payments, but if you plan on financing your education through private loans, lenders can use your credit score to determine your interest rate and fees. The worse your credit, the more interest you’ll pay on the loan.

6. Auto insurance

According to The Zebra’s State of Auto Insurance Report, there’s a correlation between credit and car insurance rates. On a national level, drivers with poor credit can pay more than twice as much as those with excellent credit for insurance. Some states have banned insurance providers from using credit scores to determine rates, but it’s a common practice in the states that allow it.

7. Homeowners insurance

Insurance companies use credit-based insurance scores to determine what you’ll pay for homeowners insurance. These scores are industry-specific and aren’t exactly the same as your credit score, but they use the information in your credit report to determine your score. The same negative marks that bring down your credit score can impact your insurance score, and affect your payment.

Given your credit’s affect on nearly every bill in your mailbox (among other things, of course), it’s important to regularly monitor your credit for errors (you can go here to learn how to dispute those), identity theft or legitimate negative items that are affecting your score. You can pull your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com and view your free credit report snapshot every month on Credit.com. You can generally improve your bad credit by paying down high credit card balances, shoring up accounts in delinquency and limiting new credit inquiries while your credit score rebounds.

More from Credit.com

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

Brian Acton is a freelance writer and contributor at Credit.com. Several years ago, as he worked to pay down debt and purchase a home, Brian became interested in personal finance and credit. He has been covering these topics ever since. Brian has a BA in History from Salisbury University and an MBA from UMUC. He lives in Maryland with his wife and two dogs. More by Brian Acton

 Original Article

Seriously Good Car Insurance

Seriously Good Car Insurance

For Seriously Good Car Insurance visit: Scott Lynch Agency or call (317) 420-2867

Insurance Terms Made Easy: Subrogation

Watch this video to learn about Subrogation. For more information about insurance visit our website Scott Lynch Agency

Insurance Terms Made Easy: Subrogation

Insurance Terms Made Easy Subrogation

6 Free Apps for Contractors

by Amanda Prischak on April 4, 2017

Payroll, taxes, operations—there are lots of details to stay on top of when you run your own business.

Fortunately, today’s evolving technology makes it easier than ever to be organized. And small business owners rely on it: A survey conducted by the National Small Business Association revealed that 70 percent of small business owners said that technology is key to their success. 

Of course, more complex technology solutions can cost quite a bit. But many others charge only a modest fee—or are even free. That’s the case with the six phone apps below. They can help you get the job done at no extra cost. Read on to see how.

The app: Google Keep

Best for: Creating lists

What it does: When you need to offload an idea for later use, this is the app you’ll want to use. Google Keep lets you create notes and lists, set reminders, loop in a “collaborator” and more. Even better, it automatically syncs to your devices.

The app:Bubble Level (for Android) and iHandy Level (for iOS)

Best for: Calibrating surfaces

What it does: Forgot your level? That’s no problem when you have either of these apps. They’ll help you check surfaces, calculate angles and more. 

The app: Safety Meeting App

Best for: Getting help with OSHA compliance

What it does: With versions for 34 trade types, Safety Meeting App lets you track safety meetings, accidents, employee attendance and much more. It also has information on 950 safety topics. The first year is free.

The app: Wave

Best for: Staying on top of accounting

What it does: Whether you want to create and send an invoice, scan a receipt or create an accounting report, Wave has you covered. The free version offers a surprising number of services—and more complicated functions like paying employees are available for a fee.

The app: Construction Manager

Best for: Staying connected to the people in the office and the field

What it does: Whether you need to share project estimates, time sheets or maintenance logs, Construction Manager has you covered. It lets everyone stay in the loop, no matter where they may be. It also lets salespeople and estimators create on-site estimates for projects. The app is free, and you have the option of purchasing options that block advertising, give you unlimited form submissions and more.

The app: SignNow

Best for: Gathering signatures

What it does: How does signing a document or getting someone’s signature with no need to mail, fax or scan anything sound? SignNow makes that possible with just one simple finger stroke serving as your signature. The free version gives you five signatures a month—after that, it’s just $6.99 a month for the service.

Erie Insurance does not endorse the apps described above. Please do your own investigation and make up your own mind whether any of these apps is right for you.

For Business Insurance in Indiana visit: Scott Lynch Insurance

Ask ERIE: What’s the Difference Between a Certificate of Insurance and an Additional Insured?

by Amanda Prischak on March 22, 2017

You typically come across these issues when you’re talking about business insurance. It’s easy to get them confused.

The key difference between a certificate of insurance and an additional insured comes down to whether you have coverage under someone else’s insurance policy. This only applies if you’re named as an additional insured on a policy.

What’s an additional insured?

When you’re named an additional insured on a policy, you are typically insured for covered claims arising from the Named Insured’s negligence (or your joint negligence) with regard to the premises, project and equipment that’s described in the additional insured endorsement. This commonly will include defense costs should you need to hire an attorney if the claim falls within the terms of the additional insured endorsement.

Businesses typically request to be named as an additional insured on a policy if another business’s negligence could affect them. Two examples could include:

  • A general contractor hires a subcontractor to help with a project. The subcontractor does negligent work, which leads someone to get injured and file a lawsuit against both the general contractor and the subcontractor. By being named an additional insured on the subcontractor’s policy, the general contractor  may obtain coverage under the subcontractor’s policy within the policy’s limits.
  • A wholesaler-distributor distributes products manufactured by another company. A product injures someone, and the injured person files a lawsuit against the wholesaler-distributer and the manufacturer. By being named an additional insured on the manufacturer’s policy, the wholesaler-distributer may obtain coverage under the manufacturer’s policy within the policy’s limits.

A business is usually added as an additional insured via an endorsement to a business insurance policy. Many contracts spell out who should be named as an additional insured on a business’ policy.

There are two ways most policies treat additional insureds: on a specific basis and on a blanket basis. A specific basis is just that—a specific person or business is named as an additional insured on a policy.

Meanwhile, a blanket basis covers anyone who meets the definition of “additional insured” as it’s spelled out in the policy. The policy typically names broad types of parties like “contractors” or “landlords.”

What is a certificate of insurance?

A certificate of insurance is a document that shows that insurance coverage is in effect. It shows the dates of coverage, the limits, and the line of business that’s covered.

The certificate shows that a policy is in force—but that doesn’t mean the person or business requesting it is covered as well. As a certificate holder, you are only receiving proof that the insurance policy exists; the certificate of insurance is not an insurance policy and does not provide coverage or serve to amend or alter the terms of an insurance policy.

A certificate of insurance is usually requested by one party in an agreement, contract or transaction to make sure another party has the appropriate insurance coverage. A certificate of insurance does not entitle you to rights as an additional insured. For example, you aren’t provided any coverage under the other party’s policy in the event of a loss, unless the policy has been endorsed to provide coverage. For that reason, the best way to verify that you have been added to a policy as an additional insured is to request proof that the additional insured endorsement has been added to the  insurance policy. If the policy has been endorsed with the additional insured form, the certificate will often include the form number and specific information about the endorsement that reflects what has been added to the policy. Proof may therefore be a certificate with this information listed or an actual copy of the declarations showing the endorsement.

As you can see, additional insureds and certificates of insurance can be pretty tricky. And not having the right information can put you (as well as your business) at financial risk. That’s why it’s so important to have an insurance professional like an Erie Insurance agent in your corner. An Erie Insurance agent in your community can help you make sense of these issues and more.