Game Over

The play date was all fun and games until your four-year-old threw a toy and injured his friend’s eye. Now his parents are claiming negligence and threatening to hit you with a lawsuit.

Umbrella Game Over

#gameover #lifeisunpredictable

Apply here: http://bit.ly/2EIv6aq

Conditions apply: http://bit.ly/2EIVOjo

Learn more: http://bit.ly/2EM3vp8

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Prepare for Extreme Weather – Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late

First of all, our hearts and prayers go out to all those families and businesses that were damaged over the last couple of days due to weather.

After the storm hits is not the time to discover you don’t have the proper coverage. Renters, are you aware that if your apartment/home/mobile home or condo is destroyed by weather that your landlord is not responsible for your possesions and may not even have to help you with a place to stay. This is why it is important to have a Renter’s Insurance Policy. Do you have enough coverage as a homeowner to cover your home and possesions during a loss? Do you have enough roof coverage? After the storm happens is too late to correct these things. Call your agent or us at (317) 886-0081 for a home/renters insurance review.

“Far too often residents of Indiana are not aware if they have adequate coverage from their insurance policies, especially when it comes to damage as a result of storms that produce heavy rains and cause flooding. The Department urges Hoosiers to review their insurance policies, including rental insurance to make sure they understand their coverage before a disaster hits,” said Indiana Department of Insurance Commissioner Stephen W. Robertson.

The Indiana Department of Insurance offers tips on disaster preparedness, including what to do before and after a storm hits, and how to protect yourself from fraud, on a 5/28/2019 Consumer Alert.

Understanding Extreme Weather Hazards

Check the weather online or a broadcast outlet every morning to better understand what the day may bring. Unpredictable weather means storms can come on quickly, taking you by surprise. Consider the following:

  • Tornadoes can hit anywhere, anytime. Of the 50 states, 49 have experienced a tornado since 2005. Make sure to identify a shelter and practice an annual family tornado drill.
  • Lightning is common, even if getting struck is rare. Stay inside during a lightning storm and take precautions such as unplugging your appliances and avoid talking on a phone.
  • Flash floods are the cause of the most deaths associated with severe weather. Just one inch of water can cause $20,000 in damage to your home. If you live in a 100-year floodplain, there’s more than a 25 percent chance that you’ll be flooded during a 30-year mortgage. In that period, you are 27 times more likely to experience a flood than have a fire. It takes just 12 inches of rushing water to carry away a car. Don’t ever drive or walk into flood waters and never underestimate the power of flowing water.

Create a Home Inventory

To make the claims process easier, create a home inventory of your belongings. Include identifying information about your possessions (brand name, price, purchase date, model, serial number and receipts) and take photos. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) has created a free smartphone app that will help you create a database of your possessions. The app is available for iPhone and Android. A simple-to-use printable home inventory checklist is also available.

If you don’t have time to create a full list of the items in your home, consider videotaping and/or taking photographs in every room. The more detail you include, the easier it will be for your insurer to evaluate your loss. When making your list, open drawers and closets, and don’t forget to document what’s in your basement, garage and storage buildings.

Once you’ve created your inventory, send the information to your insurance agent and/or keep it on your app.

Collect Your Insurance Information

Before a storm hits, review your insurance policies. Make sure you know what is and is not covered. If you have questions, contact your insurance agent or insurer.

Store electronic copies of your insurance policies with your home inventory and keep paper files in a safety deposit box. Make sure to have a copy of your policy declarations page listing all of your coverages, as well as your insurance cards.

Collect the 24-hour contact information for your insurance agent and insurer and enter it as a contact on your smartphone. Make a list that includes your policy numbers, insurer and insurance agent’s phone numbers, website addresses and mailing addresses. Also, check to see if the company or agent has an emergency information hotline. It is a good idea to store this information — and your home inventory — in a waterproof, fireproof box or safe. If you evacuate your home, take this information with you.

Note: Flood damage is generally not covered by a standard homeowners or renter’s insurance policy. If you have a separate flood insurance policy, remember to include a copy of the policy and the contact details for the insurer on your list. Flood is a covered event in most auto insurance policies. If you need flood insurance, you’ll want to purchase it now because typically there is a 30-day waiting period from the date of purchase before the policy goes into effect. For more information about flood insurance, check out this consumer alert issued by the Indiana Department of Insurance.

Prepare for the Worst

To help lessen the damage caused by a storm, take stock of your home. Clear your yard of debris that could become projectiles in high winds and trim dead or overhanging branches from trees surrounding your home. Ensure the roof sheathing is properly secured. Fasten end gables to the roof. Latch doors and garage doors properly. Secure shutters and outdoor furniture.

For personal safety, identify the nearest storm shelter and have an emergency or evacuation plan for your family. Practice your evacuation plan, making sure everyone knows where emergency supplies are stored. Have a storm survival kit that includes bottled water, a first-aid kit, flashlights, a battery-operated radio, at least three days of nonperishable food items, blankets, clothing, prescription drugs, eyeglasses and personal hygiene supplies.

If you must evacuate your home, turn off all utilities and disconnect appliances, reducing the chance of additional damage and electrical shock when utilities are restored.

For more information about how to prepare your family and home for weather threats, visit the American Red Cross.

After the Storm

The days following a natural disaster can be confusing and stressful, but report your insurance claim(s) as quickly as possible to help protect your financial future.

Contact your insurer and/or agent with your policy number and other relevant information. Be aware that your policy might require that you make this notification within a certain time frame.

Document damage by taking photographs/video before you begin any clean-up. After you’ve documented the damage, make repairs necessary to prevent further harm to your property (cover broken windows, leaking roofs and damaged walls). Don’t make permanent repairs until your insurer has inspected the property and you have reached an agreement on the cost. Be prepared to provide the claims adjuster with records of any improvements you made prior to the damage. Save all receipts, including those from temporary fixes.

If your home is damaged to the extent that you cannot live there, ask your insurer or insurance agent if you have coverage for additional living expenses.

Work with your insurer to learn what documents, forms and data you need for your claim. Keep a diary of all conversations you have with the insurer and your insurance agent, including names, times and dates of the calls or visits, and contact details. Provide your insurer with all of the requested information, as incorrect or incomplete information may delay your claim.

10 things you didn’t know about Memorial Day

More than 1 million men and women who have lost their lives defending America in wars from the Revolution to the global war on terrorism will be remembered on Memorial Day. Flags will be placed at gravesites, ceremonies and parades will be held, and many more events will occur nationwide to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.
052119_MemorialDay
Parents of Army Chief Warrant Officer 3 Corey Goodnature lay a wreath on his grave at Graceland Cemetery in Albert Lea, Minn. Goodnature was killed on June 28, 2005, in eastern Afghanistan when his MH-47D helicopter was shot down by enemy fire. Photo by Justin L. Stewart/The American Legion

In honor of Memorial Day, here are some things you may not know about the holiday.

1. Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day. Gen. John A. Logan, commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, called for a day of remembrance on May 30, 1868, “for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion.” Nearly 620,000 soldiers lost their lives in the Civil War.

2. On the first Decoration Day in 1868, Gen. James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, where 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there. (via history.com)

3. In 1966, Congress declared Waterloo, N.Y., the official birthplace of Memorial Day for being the first town to celebrate the holiday 100 years prior. Waterloo, which first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866, was chosen because it hosted an annual event where residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flags and flowers. (via history.com)

4. In 1968, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May, instead of May 30, in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees. The change went into effect in 1971. (via history.com)

5. On Dec. 28, 2000, President Bill Clinton signed into law the National Moment of Remembrance Act, which asks Americans to pause on Memorial Day at 3 p.m. local time for one minute to honor those who died protecting America’s rights and freedoms. (via time.com)

6. On Memorial Day, the U.S. flag should be displayed at half-staff from sunrise until noon, then raised to the top at full staff until sunset. (via legion.org)

7. Red poppies are to be worn the Friday before Memorial Day. The red poppy is a nationally recognized symbol of sacrifice worn by Americans since World War I to honor those who served and died for our country in all wars. The American Legion brought National Poppy Day® to the United States by asking Congress to designate the Friday before Memorial Day as National Poppy Day. After World War I, the poppy flourished in Europe. The red poppy came to symbolize the blood shed during battle following the publication of the wartime poem “In Flanders Fields.” The poem was written by Lt. Col. John McCrae, M.D. while serving on the front lines. (via legion.org)

8. The American Automobile Association estimates that more than 36 million people will travel at least 50 miles from home this Memorial Day. (via time.com)

9. The American Legion traditionally has a float in the 500 Festival Parade in the National Headquarters city of Indianapolis; as the Indy 500 is held over Memorial Day weekend, it essentially doubles as the city’s Memorial Day parade. This year’s Legion float has the theme “Turning the Corner Into the Next Century.”

10. “Peak hot dog season” is considered to start on Memorial Day; between then and Labor Day, Americans will likely eat 7 billion hot dogs, or 818 every second during that period. (via hot-dog.org)

New Indiana Program Dedicated to US Military Members and Veterans

Veterans Honored in Indiana

You stepped up and answered the call by serving in our armed forces. Now Indiana wants you to be a Hoosier.

Next Level Veterans is your source for career training and a homebuyer program designed for active duty veterans and retired military personnel.

The Need

  1. More than 200,000 service men and women leave the military every year, and over half currently face a period of unemployment.
  2. There are 85,000 unfilled jobs in Indiana. Employers need people equipped with the skills and work ethic to get the job done.

 

 

 

INVETS

INVETS – More than a simple job board, INvets details the combination of career potential and the quality of the surrounding community. Indiana has communities to meet any need and every employer has unique characteristics and opportunities. Look around and you might just find the perfect combination for you.

NextLevel Jobs Indiana

NEXTLevel Jobs INDIANA – Next Level Jobs provides Hoosiers with free state-wide training in high-paying, in-demand industries. Next Level Jobs also provides Indiana employers with reimbursements up to $50,000 to train their employees in these high-growth fields.

HONOR OUR VETS

HONOR OUR VETS – In Indiana we truly honor our vets through a new program under Governor Eric Holcomb’s Next Level Veterans initiative. The Honor Our Vets program offered by the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) is specifically designed to keep and welcome qualified active duty, veterans and retired military personnel to the state.

Indiana Economic Development Association

Indiana Economic Development Association – Welcome to the Indiana Economic Development Association, the voice of economic development for Indiana. Made up of economic developers, utilities, attorneys, consultants, financial institutions, higher education professionals, engineers, architects and construction professionals, our members are passionately dedicated to attracting and retaining jobs for the great people of Indiana.

Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership

Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership – Uniting the region with a common mission and vision for Northeast Indiana ensures that as we develop strategies to build a globally competitive region and to support our mission to increase business investment.

Indiana Department of Veteran's Affairs

Indiana Department of Veteran’s Affairs – Since its establishment in 1945, the Indiana Department of Veterans Affairs (IDVA) has remained focused on aiding and assisting “Hoosier” veterans, and qualified family members or survivors, who are eligible for benefits or advantages provided by Indiana and the U.S. government. Indiana owes a great debt to its veterans, past and present, for their personal sacrifices and dedicated service. 75 Hoosiers (1 still living) have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in testimony to their courage and sacrifices.

Visit Indiana

Visit Indiana – How do you choose what destinations to include in your next Indiana getaway? Start here with the Best of Indiana lists, as voted on by travelers just like you.

Indiana Department of Workforce Development

Indiana Department of Workforce Development – Indiana is committed to providing quality employment services to Veterans at our WorkOne Centers. Veterans go to the front of the line and each office has an onsite Veteran’s representative that assists with employment needs. All Veterans are encouraged to make contact with their local WorkOne Career Center for assistance.

Transition Time for Veterans (an interactive tool)

This interactive tool allows Veterans to estimate the preparation time required to transition from their military occupation to another one in Indiana. “Transition time,” while measured in weeks of academic, technical or vocational training, is a relative measure to provide an estimate of the relative time moving from one type of job to another. Find out more here.

Thanks to Bryce, other babies can be saved

By: Cindy Kirchhofer State Representative

A Hoosier family’s struggle will help save the lives of others. Bryce Clausen was a one-year-old who was diagnosed with Krabbe, a rare genetic disease, and recently passed away. His difficult journey and shortened life highlight the need to screen newborns for the disease.

There is no cure for Krabbe, but those diagnosed and treated early have better chances of living longer, healthier lives. Once symptoms appear, it is too late for treatment. Bryce was not screened at birth, and his diagnosis came only after symptoms appeared.

In addition to Krabbe, the new law I supported also adds Pompe disease and Hurler syndrome to Indiana’s newborn screening panel. This was the first bill signed into law by Gov. Eric Holcomb this session.

Our hearts ache for Bryce and his family who bravely shared their story to help save others. The Clausen’s are true heroes who turned their struggle into meaningful change.

In addition to pushing for this legislation, the Clausen’s are raising money to sponsor a theme room in Bryce’s name at the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital. To learn more about Bryce’s battle and support their efforts, click here.

Bryce’s Story
Written by Joel Clausen, Bryce’s father

Bryce Harlan Clausen was born January 25, 2018 at 10:02am at 37 weeks. Bryce was born via C-section due to a few complications with mom and baby. After birth, Bryce spent 15 days in the NICU while dealing with some lung and feeding issues. 15 of the longest days of his parents life, but 15 days that showed what an absolute warrior Bryce was. So many folks, family/friends/others, reached out to help support the family while Bryce was confined to the NICU. So many people reached out that wanted to help in any way they could which led Bryce’s parents to start a GoFundMe page with the sole purpose of giving back to every single doctor or nurse that had helped care for Bryce while in the hospital. Thousands of dollars raised later and on advise from a nurse family friend, who told the family that nurse break room luxuries are paid for by the nurses themselves, the Clausen’s bought a brand new fridge and microwave for the NICU break room. They also made individual care packages for more than 50 nurses and doctors. Finally, with the remaining funds, a book cart was purchased for the NICU floor, complete with a premie book written by a family friend that has Bryce’s name on the inside of each of the books. Bryce’s legacy was started, seemingly at birth.

For the first few months of Bryce’s life, he was just like any other baby. He was laughing and playing and was as happy as any baby could be. Things started to change with Bryce at about 5 months of life. He became very upset for hours and hours a day. He stopped rolling over and smiling all together. His body became stiff, often times he was so stiff his parents couldn’t even remove his onesies. He refused to take a bottle. He was losing weight. Numerous trips to his pediatrician to try different things to help him all led to nothing more than more questions than answers. Bryce underwent an MRI and on November 1, 2018, Bryce was diagnosed with Krabbe disease. Krabbe disease is a neurological disease that attacks the myelin, the protective covering around the nerve cells. It is an extremely rare disease. There is no cure and unfortunately it is terminal. 60% of babies make it to one year of life, 16% make it to their 2nd birthday. He will most likely go blind and deaf. He has already started to lose his vision. He will never smile again. He will never crawl or walk or talk.

At this point, his parents are trying to make Bryce as comfortable as possible. They are choosing to make his life as great as possible for however long Bryce has. Part of their quality of life is sharing experiences with Bryce. The Clausen’s refuse to call this a “Bucket List”, instead call it a “Greatest Hits List”, in a nod to experiences his parents and family think a boy should experience. Things like, his first NFL game, playing in the snow, finger painting, a road trip, and most importantly…..making a difference in others lives. In January 2019, Bryce was admitted to Peyton Manning Children Hospital for bacterical pneumonia. He and his father, Joel, stayed in room 4003. While there, Joel noticed that the room was bare and no decorations on the walls. Joel inquired as to why the room was blank and was told that the room was not sponsored. Many of the other rooms have fun themes like a superhero room (Bryce had previsouly stayed in that room), a car room, numerous Colt themed rooms, etc. Joel couldn’t let that thought go, that children admitted to the hospital, sick or hurt, going through some of the worst parts of their young lives and having to be in a boring room wouldn’t make them feel any better. Something had to be done. Here is Bryce’s chance to leave his legacy. Here is Bryces chance to make a difference in someone elses life. Here is Bryces chance to cross off another item on his “Greatest Hits List”.

As much as the Clausen’s would love to do this all by themselves, the $50,000 room sponsor fee is just not in their budget. While they focus on keeping Bryce comfortable and keep him on a busy schedule of medicine and doctor appointments (including trips to Krabbe specialists in Pittsburgh) they can’t stop thinking about helping others. They know what these families are going through that are staying in these rooms. They know the simple joy that a fun themed room can do for a child. In a complex world, it sometimes is the simple things. In a life that is being cut short by a terrible, nasty, rare disease….. leaving a legacy that can live on long after Bryce is the greatest hit on the “Greatest Hits List”

 Click here to support the Clausen family’s themed room project at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St. Vincent!

How To Save Money On Auto Insurance

Photo by Alexander Mils from Pexels

We all are looking to find ways to save money. We don’t want to save money today by dropping coverages that we will need tomorrow. What is important and what are some ways to save money on auto insurance.

Watch this short video for a few options:

How to Save Money On Your Auto Insurance

Other things that can help with your auto insurance, in addition to what the video mentioned.

  • Good credit
  • Driving monitors for the first 90 days
  • Good grades
  • No lapse in coverage
  • Annual reviews of your policy with your agent
  • Vehicles with factory installed safety devices

Call us at (317) 886-0081 to discuss your options or go here and get a quote today: Get a Quote.

Please be safe out there!

Now THAT’S meal prepping! Mom-of-two chops up all her vegetables for the entire YEAR

Sophie Haslett For Daily Mail Australia

 21:36 EDT, 9 April 2019

Original Article

Now THAT’S meal prepping! Mum-of-two chops up all her vegetables for the entire YEAR – including 20kg of potatoes, 15kg of carrots and 10kg of onion

  • A mum of two and ex chef showed off her impressive frozen food prep
  • The working mum jokingly said she expects it to last the family ‘the next year’
  • She included 15kg of carrot, 20kg of potatoes, 15kg of sweet potatoes and more
  • The woman said she spent $80 on wholesale veg in order to prep the food

A budget-savvy mother-of-two has showed off her impressive freezer filled with frozen vegetables, which she intends to feed her family with for the next year.

The mum and ex-chef shared a snap of her giant freezer and her chopped vegetables in zip-lock bags, writing ‘Veg prep for what feels like the next year lol’.

Included in the selection was 15 kilograms of carrot, 20 kilograms of potatoes, 15 kilograms of sweet potatoes and more.’

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She wrote in a Facebook post: ’15kg of carrot: sliced, roast chunks and chopped.

’20kg of Sebago potatoes: roast chunks, sliced for potato baked and diced for mash.

’15kg of sweet potato: roast chunks, sliced for potato bake and diced for mash.

’10kg of onion: sliced, chopped and chunks for roast, onion rings.

‘2kg of zucchini: julienne and roast chunks.’

Her freezer also included one kilo of capsicum, sliced, two pumpkins in chunks and 10 kilograms of tomatoes, which she had diced.

The woman said she bought the vegetables wholesale for a total of $80.

The freezer post was a hit with others online, who wrote comments like: ‘Now that’s being organised’ and ‘Wow’.

Some questioned how the woman managed to find the time to carry out such a meal prepping feat, and she said ‘it helps that I used to be a chef’.

The mum said the reason why she did it is because she currently has ‘six adults and two kids’ living under one roof.

‘I do it so I don’t have to waste time every night chopping up veg for dinner, as we all work and I have uni and the two kids have after school sports,’ she said.

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Others asked whether the mum had ‘pre-cooked’ any of the vegetables before putting them in the bags in the freezer.

‘None of this is pre-cooked and the roast vegetables turn out great,’ the woman replied.

‘Just need to thaw out properly so I take it all out the night before. Diced up carrot and onion and that type of stuff is for slow cooker and spaghetti etc.’

She also said that onion doesn’t smell out a freezer, provided it is kept tightly locked in a zip-lock bag.

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Some in the Facebook group have been inspired by the mum to take on extreme meal prepping.

‘Thank you for sharing,’ one person wrote.

‘I was thinking I need to meal prep on a weekend because I work a 10-hour day and travel 45 minutes to and from work.

‘I am exhausted when I get home for hubby and two adult kids. This is a great way to be organised to eat healthier, love my veggies!

‘Just add meat for the main, will save you dollar on takeout and unhealthy alternative choices.’

 

Indianapolis Colts: The Exhibit

Indianapolis Colts: The Exhibit

Indiana Historical Society – Details HERE

450 West Ohio St. Indianapolis, IN 46202

Tel: (317) 232-1882

Mar 10, 2018 – Aug 10, 2019 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Since 1984, the Indianapolis Colts have captured the hearts and loyalties of central Indiana residents. Memorable players, inspiring coaches, heart-stopping games and two glorious stadiums have cemented the team’s place in the annals of Indianapolis history. Visit Indianapolis Colts: The Exhibit to celebrate the team while exploring football’s role in American culture through digital activities, player interviews, original artifacts, photographs and video of the Colts in action.

Discover how American football grew out of the rugby fields of Ivy League academies into the modern game loved by millions through sweeping changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Witness the Hoosier Dome and Lucas Oil Stadium’s rise into the Indianapolis skyline to redefine the city’s image as a championship town. Snap a picture with your favorite virtual Colts player and learn about their views on football, leadership and the NFL. Cast your vote for the best Colts player or the most memorable game moment and see how your choice compares to other fans. See the game through the eyes of officials by making a call on a real NFL play and find out if your decision matches the actual call. Relive the glory of the 2006 season and how the players and the coaches made it all possible. Scramble on the field as the Colts mascot Blue to juke and dodge oncoming tackles using your whole body. Explore the rise of the NFL and how it became the multibillion-dollar juggernaut it is today.

But most of all, connect with the story of the Colts and how they became a team that embodies the values, drive and heart of the city they call home.

Presented by: The Indianapolis Colts

Supported by: PLOW

Teen Driver Safety

As the parent of a Teen Driver you worry constantly. Did you properly prepare them for this huge step in their lives? Request our Parent-Teen Contract and sit down with your Teen Driver and go over it. This may be one of the most important kitchen table talks that you have with them. We will periodically send you other Teen Driver information to share with your young or future driver.

Visit HERE to request the Parent-Teen Contract.

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April is Tornado Awareness Month

April is Tornado Awareness Month. Do you know where to seek shelter during a tornado? Learn what to do before, during & after one hits.

Image by Jonny Lindner from Pixabay
Image by Jonny Lindner from Pixabay

Tornadoes

Tornadoes can destroy your home, your business, buildings, flip cars, and create deadly flying debris. Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air that extend from a thunderstorm to the ground. Tornadoes can:

  • Happen anytime and anywhere;
  • Bring intense winds, over 200 MPH; and
  • Look like funnels.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A TORNADO WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • If you can safely get to a sturdy building, then do so immediately.
  • Go to a safe room, basement, or storm cellar.
  • If you are in a building with no basement, then get to a small interior room on the lowest level.
  • Stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You’re safer in a low, flat location.
  • Watch out for flying debris that can cause injury or death.
  • Use your arms to protect your head and neck.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A TORNADO THREATENS

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s tornado risk. In the U.S., the Midwest and the Southeast have a greater risk for tornadoes.
  • Know the signs of a tornado, including a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud; an approaching cloud of debris; or a loud roar—similar to a freight train.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts. If your community has sirens, then become familiar with the warning tone.
  • Pay attention to weather reports. Meteorologists can predict when conditions might be right for a tornado.
  • Identify and practice going to a safe shelter in the event of high winds, such as a safe room built using FEMA criteria or a storm shelter built to ICC 500 standards. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room on the lowest level of a sturdy building.
  • Consider constructing your own safe room that meets FEMA or ICC 500 standards.

 Survive DURING

  • Immediately go to a safe location that you identified.
  • Take additional cover by shielding your head and neck with your arms and putting materials such as furniture and blankets around you.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in a vehicle.
  • If you are in a car or outdoors and cannot get to a building, cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body with a coat or blanket, if possible.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Keep listening to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, and local authorities for updated information.
  • If you are trapped, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust. Try to send a text, bang on a pipe or wall, or use a whistle instead of shouting.
  • Stay clear of fallen power lines or broken utility lines.
  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe.
  • Save your phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messaging or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear thick-soled shoes, long pants, and work gloves.

Associated Content