What Car Drivers Need to Know about Motorcycles

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Summer is here, which means you’ll likely see more motorcycles on the road. And the key word here is “see.” People driving cars and trucks often fail to notice the motorcyclists around them, partly because they’re not accustomed to looking for them.

It’s obvious yet bears repeating: Motorcyclists are much more vulnerable than car and truck drivers and passengers. Not only are there many more cars and trucks on the road, but there’s no such thing as a “fender bender” for a motorcyclist. Even a low-speed collision can seriously injure a rider, not to mention total the bike, so it’s important to always give motorcycles extra space and an extra look.

Below are six tips to help you safely share the road with motorcyclists.

Objects in mirror. The object in your mirror may be closer than it appears — especially if it’s a motorcycle. Due to its size, it can be harder to determine how close a motorcycle is and how fast it’s moving. When turning into traffic, always estimate a bike to be closer than it appears to avoid forcing a rider to quickly hit the brakes — or worse.

Watch those left turns. One of the most common motorcycle accidents involves a car making a left turn directly in front of a bike at an intersection. Give yourself an extra moment to look specifically for motorcycles coming toward you when turning into traffic.

Double-check your blind spot. Carefully checking your blind spot before changing lanes is always a good idea. When it comes to motorcycles, it’s critical. A bike can be easily obscured in the blind spot, hidden behind your car’s roof pillars, or blend in with cars in other lanes, so make a habit of checking carefully before changing lanes. Plus, always use your turn signal.

Don’t tailgate. This is another general rule for all drivers, but it’s especially important when following a motorcycle. Be aware that many riders decrease speed by downshifting or easing off the throttle, so you won’t see any brake lights even though they are slowing down. Following at least three seconds behind the bike should give you enough time and space to safely slow down or stop when necessary.

Stay in your lane. Obviously, motorcycles don’t take up an entire lane the way cars or trucks do. But that doesn’t mean you can cozy up and share a lane with a bike. Just because the rider may be hugging one side of the lane doesn’t mean you can move into that space. Riders are likely doing this to avoid debris, oil on the road, or a pothole, so a bit of mild swerving within the lane can be expected. Do not crowd into the lane with a bike.

Think about motorcycles. Making a habit of always checking for bikes when you drive will make the above tips second nature, and make you a better driver. To personalize it, think about your friends and family members who ride bikes and then drive as if they are on the road with you. Motorcyclists — and everyone else — will thank you.

To learn more protecting yourself and your bike, view our motorcycle coverage options.

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Cell phone users twice as likely to be involved in a crash, study finds

JAN 24, 2018 | BY DENNY JACOB, PROPERTYCASUALTY360

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety compared drivers’ odds of crash involvement when using a cell phone relative to driving without performing any observable secondary tasks

The role of cell phones in our society faces greater scrutiny in recent years, particularly when it comes to the world of driving.

Distracted driving can happen in a number of ways, but smartphones are often behind a case of distracted driving more often than not.

study conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety compared drivers’ odds of crash involvement when using a cell phone relative to driving without performing any observable secondary tasks, both overall and stratified by selected environmental and crash-related factors.

Related: Smartphones are killing Americans on the roads, but nobody’s counting

Data came from a sample of 3,593 drivers, whose driving was monitored using in-vehicle video and other data collection equipment for a period of several months between Oct. 2010 and Dec. 2013. Men (1,712) and women (1,878) represented age groups ranging from 16 years old to 75 years old.

Making roads safer

While the great debate over cell phones — along with many other topics, such as the future of autonomous vehicles — and distracted driving has no end in sight, studies like this one will prove useful for researchers, the automotive and electronics industries, and traffic safety advocates, among others, in making tomorrow’s roads a safer place for drivers and pedestrians alike.

Distracted driving study

Asterisks in tables denote instances in which there were too few crashes and/or baseline epochs involving a specific cell phone task to compute an odds ratio.(Photo: Crash Risk of Cell Phone Use While Driving: A Case-Crossover Analysis of Naturalistic Driving Data)

The results

The study found that “visual-manual interaction with cell phones while driving, particularly but not exclusively relative to text messaging, was associated with approximately double the incidence of crash involvement relative to driving without performing any observable secondary tasks.”

Notably, 42 of 65 crashes that involved any form of visual-manual interaction with cell phones involved texting. Hand-held cell phone conversation, location/reaching for/answering the phone, and overall cell phone use (all manner of cell phone use combined) were associated with elevated risk of crash involvement.

Related: America’s roadways need to be digitalized

Assocations between visual-manual cell phone interaction and crash risk tended to be stronger in free-flow traffic and in types of crashes in which the subject driver played a clear role, such as rear-end and road-departure crashes.

While hopes for a world without distracted driving may be ways away, drivers who continue to use their cell phones on the road will remain an issue for the foreseeable future. Until then, drivers must remember that driving is a privilege, and that the road is a shared space between drivers and pedestrians alike.

For your auto insurance quote visit: Scott Lynch Agency

Original Article

Radar Guns That Bust Texting Behind the Wheel

by Amanda Prischak on 

It’s no secret that drivers face many distractions behind the wheel.

Perhaps no source of distracted driving gets as much attention these days as texting while driving. Policymakers have tackled the problem with legislation banning the dangerous habit. Meanwhile, one state has even created text stops on its major highways.

It sounds crazy, but the next tactic may very well be a radar gun that can detect drivers who text behind the wheel. A company in Virginia is working on just such a device.

It’s uncertain if law enforcement officials in the states that ban texting while driving will use the radar guns. But that hasn’t stopped people from raising questions about whether the technology constitutes an invasion of privacy. Meanwhile, others have questioned the logistics of how the gun knows a driver, rather than a passenger, is texting.

Learn more about these radar guns by reading the source article at yahoo.com.