Danica Patrick’s Message

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After listening to Danica’s message visit us at: Scott Lynch Agency or call us at (317) 420-2867 to discuss your options.

 

Protect Your Pets from Hot Cars

by Jennifer Sonntag on July 7, 2017

To a dog, there’s nothing more exciting than going for a ride, having the window rolled down and feeling the wind in your ears. However, when the car stops and owners run a “quick” errand, what can happen to your pet is dangerous. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), hundreds of pets die in hot cars each year. Time passes faster than owners realize and car temperatures can climb to well over 115 degrees, putting your pet’s life in danger.

How fast does a car’s temperature rise? Here are some examples:

When it’s 70 degrees outside, your car’s temperature inside is 89 degrees after just 10 minutes and up to 104 degrees after a half hour. If you’re traveling with your pet on an 85 degree day, your car’s temperature is 104 degrees after 10 minutes and nearly 120 degrees after a half hour. Pets cool themselves by panting and through their skin and have a harder time cooling down in hot weather. In a hot car, heat stroke can happen in just a few minutes.

What to do if you see a pet in a hot car

Take caution when you see a pet in a hot car. If you identify a pet is in distress in a hot vehicle, the best thing to do is contact local law enforcement. Some states have laws against leaving a pet in a hot car, however, it varies. Obtain guidance from law enforcement before taking action and breaking a car window on your own. Once you call law enforcement, stay by the vehicle and keep an eye on the pet until help arrives.

How to treat a pet with heat stroke
First, it’s important to know the signs of a heat stroke:

Warning signs: panting, drooling and lethargy
Advanced stage: grey or blue gums, limp body posture with heavy breathing and the pet may be in shock

Cooling the Pet Down

  • Get your pet to an air-conditioned environment
  • Work to cool the pet down by wetting the ears and pads of the feet with cool water (do not use frigid water, use cool water).
  • Place cool, wet towels over the shoulder/neck, under the front legs and in the groin area
  • Refresh the water frequently
  • If the pet will drink, provide cool water or small ice chips


What to do if the pet is unresponsive

  • Call an emergency veterinarian immediately and tell them you’re on your way.
  • If the gums are gray/blue, they are in need of immediate treatment and should be rushed to the nearest emergency treatment center.
  • They will help cool the dog and administer subcutaneous fluids.


Additional Tips for Pet Owners in the Summer

  • Short-nosed, long-haired and young dogs are more at risk and prone to heat stroke.
  • On hot days, limit exercising your pet to early morning or evening hours.
  • Asphalt gets very hot and could burn your pet’s paws.
  • Pets with light-colored noses or light-colored fur on their ears are vulnerable to sunburn and skin cancer. It’s safe to use sunscreen on their noses and ear tips.

If you’re going out during the summer, it’s best to keep your pet at home, in a cool, air conditioned environment.

To protect your family, visit Scott Lynch Agency

How to Get Your Kids to Play Outside

Playing outside used to be kids’ main form of entertainment. As a kid, I only went inside for food, water and much-needed sunblock.

These days, the explosion of personal cell phones, tablets and gaming devices means it’s harder to get your kids to play outside. And that’s unfortunate since playing outside gives children a chance to get physical activity and socialize with friends.

If you’re a parent, chances are you’re having a hard time peeling your kids away from TVs and touch screens. The next time your kids play the “there’s nothing to do outside” card, combat it with these ideas.

Good old-fashioned fun

Here are classic outdoor activities that most kids simply can’t turn down.

  • Host a water balloon fight: Water balloons are a cheap and easy way to cool off under the sun and get everyone outside. Have your child invite some friends over with a change of clothes and a towel. If you’d rather not deal with a mess, letting them run through the sprinkler is an equally fun alternative.
  • Create an obstacle course: On your mark, get set, go! See who can reach the swing set first after spinning around five times, hula hooping ten times and hopping over an outdoor cushion. The more creative you get, the more they’ll enjoy it.
  • Camp out in the backyard: Pitch a tent under the stars. Get the whole family involved by having a cookout or outdoor fire beforehand. Just make sure to put it out before heading to bed!

Try an app or two

Having an especially hard time getting your kids to step away from their favorite devices? Fear not, because there are ways to use the enemy to get your kids to play outside. Try one of these tactics and they’ll soon be heading out the door.

  • Catch ’em all with Pokemon Go: The popular new game allows players to digitally immerse themselves in the world of “pocket monsters” with just a smartphone. Since you have to actually move to find items, the kids’ll be off the couch pronto. See how many Pokemon they can catch around the neighborhood, just remind them to be aware of their surroundings!
  • Send them on a scavenger hunt: Give kids a list of items that can be found around the yard or, if they’re older, around the neighborhood. Instruct them to use their phones to take a picture of the item as proof they’ve found it.
  • Go geocaching: Geocaching involves finding a collection of hidden items. Make one out of an old Tupperware container with your child and then pick a place to hide it. The Android and iOS compatible Geocaching app helps users find caches and keep track of ones they’ve already found. This is an excellent activity for the whole family to take part in.
  • Do a little stargazing: There are numerous cell phone apps that help you identify constellations in the sky during different times of the year. Two that are compatible with both iOS and Android are Night Sky Light and Star Chart.

With a little creativity and a little planning, you really can get your kids to play outside this summer.

by Alex Buczynski on June 4, 2014

Original Article

Video: Helpful Tips to Keep Kids Safe on Road Trips

Video: Family Road Trip: Car Seat Safety Checklist

Millions of Americans will take to the roads this summer. In addition to mapping out your route, packing snacks and making sure your car emergency kit is fully stocked, you’ll also want to think about how to keep kids safe on the road trip.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that nearly half of all child car seats are installed incorrectly. Not completely confident that your child’s car seat is safely installed? Then watch the short video above. It has helpful correct installation and more.

Also check out our top tips on buying and installing a child safety seat. Knowing your littlest passengers are safe gives you peace of mind so you can move on to other orders of business—like how to keep kids entertained during that long drive. (Good luck!)

For your auto insurance quote visit: Scott Lynch Agency


This video originally appeared on the CJ Pony Parts Blog.

by Erie Insurance on June 13, 2017

Self-defense Can Be Costly – Make Sure your Assets are Protected

Self-defense Can Be Costly – Make Sure your Assets are Protected by Nancy Daniel on 4/14/2017

Too often we see stories in the news of innocent people being thrown into scary situations through no fault of their own. Whether it’s a robbery or burglary, home invasion or carjacking, sometimes people are forced into a life-threatening scenario.

Your first priority is protecting your family. Ours is protecting you.  That’s why ERIE introduced a new coverage to help with the expense of defending yourself in court should something unthinkable like this ever happen.

But first, let’s talk about what happens if you’re put in a situation where you have to defend yourself, your family or your property. While you should always put your personal safety first, it’s important to know the law too. Be prepared by knowing your state laws, especially if you own a firearm or have a permit to carry a concealed weapon.

What are the laws?*

In the United States, intentionally causing physical harm to another person can result in criminal or civil legal liability. In many instances a person could be liable for causing harm even if the other person had threatened or attacked first.1  Many states, however, have passed laws providing that in certain situations an individual has no duty to retreat before using force in self-defense. These are referred to as “stand your ground” laws. This article from the National Conference of State Legislatures provides state-by-state information so you can be informed.

What happens after the incident?

If you’ve had to defend yourself or your property, what happens next? Typically, after the 911 call to report the incident, you will likely go through the following steps2:

  • First responders arrive.
  • Law enforcement personnel and possibly the assistant district attorney begin the investigation.
  • You may or may not be taken into custody.  Questioning takes place – be sure to ask for your attorney as soon as possible.
  • If you were taken into custody, you may or may not be released, asked to post bond or held in jail.
  • Law enforcement may or may not file charges against you.
  • If charges are filed, the prosecutor may support or disagree with charges filed by the police.
  • At your first appearance in court you enter a plea. (Your attorney will be your advocate advising you on your plea and guiding you through the legal system.)
  • The trial process takes place.
  • The outcome is determined by a judge in a bench trial or by a jury of peers in a jury trial.
  • If found “Not Guilty”, you are acquitted. (This is where our ErieSecure Homeâ policy comes in – see below.)

Naturally, all of this can be frightening, which is why it is essential to find and retain good legal representation. And even if you’re found innocent of any wrongdoing, the legal costs can be in the thousands of dollars. ERIE can protect you by covering some of those legal costs after charges have been dropped, you’re found not guilty or you have been exonerated.

 

There’s insurance for that

Our ErieSecure Home® policy with the Select bundle now includes criminal defense cost reimbursement3. Your local ERIE agent can explain how it works and give you a quote for adding the Select bundle to an ErieSecure Home policy in order to have the coverage.

Specifically, the Select bundle includes $25,000 of coverage for defense and legal expenses incurred to defend a criminal charge arising from reasonable acts to protect people and property, when the insured is found not guilty of the charges. Examples of legal fees covered include reasonable attorney fees, bonds and actual loss of earnings.

If you’re already an ErieSecure Home customer with the Select bundle, this new coverage is automatically included. You don’t need to do anything. If you have ErieSecure Homeâ insurance but do not have additional coverage through a bundle (or have the Advantage or Plus bundle instead), talk to your ERIE agent for a quote on the Select bundle.

Helping people deal with the alarming reality of today’s news stories is just another way Erie Insurance takes good care of its customers. We believe in treating people right and this is one more way we can do that.

Original Article

*Nothing in this article is or should be considered to be legal advice.  Readers are encouraged to find and consult qualified legal advisors regarding this subject.

1 http://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/using-a-gun-self-defense-laws-and-consequences.htm

2 http://dailycaller.com/2014/11/20/step-by-step-here-is-what-will-happen-after-a-defensive-shooting/

3 The information provided here is a summary and does not include all coverages and benefits available through an ErieSecure Home® policy or apply to all states. Coverages, benefits, limits and deductibles will vary. Conditions, exclusions and limitations will apply. Refer to our disclaimer for more information. Talk to an ERIE agent for state specific policy information.

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Do you think stay-at-home moms don’t need life insurance? Teresa and her family’s story may change your mind. Watch!
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