New Indiana Program Dedicated to US Military Members and Veterans

Veterans Honored in Indiana

You stepped up and answered the call by serving in our armed forces. Now Indiana wants you to be a Hoosier.

Next Level Veterans is your source for career training and a homebuyer program designed for active duty veterans and retired military personnel.

The Need

  1. More than 200,000 service men and women leave the military every year, and over half currently face a period of unemployment.
  2. There are 85,000 unfilled jobs in Indiana. Employers need people equipped with the skills and work ethic to get the job done.

 

 

 

INVETS

INVETS – More than a simple job board, INvets details the combination of career potential and the quality of the surrounding community. Indiana has communities to meet any need and every employer has unique characteristics and opportunities. Look around and you might just find the perfect combination for you.

NextLevel Jobs Indiana

NEXTLevel Jobs INDIANA – Next Level Jobs provides Hoosiers with free state-wide training in high-paying, in-demand industries. Next Level Jobs also provides Indiana employers with reimbursements up to $50,000 to train their employees in these high-growth fields.

HONOR OUR VETS

HONOR OUR VETS – In Indiana we truly honor our vets through a new program under Governor Eric Holcomb’s Next Level Veterans initiative. The Honor Our Vets program offered by the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) is specifically designed to keep and welcome qualified active duty, veterans and retired military personnel to the state.

Indiana Economic Development Association

Indiana Economic Development Association – Welcome to the Indiana Economic Development Association, the voice of economic development for Indiana. Made up of economic developers, utilities, attorneys, consultants, financial institutions, higher education professionals, engineers, architects and construction professionals, our members are passionately dedicated to attracting and retaining jobs for the great people of Indiana.

Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership

Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership – Uniting the region with a common mission and vision for Northeast Indiana ensures that as we develop strategies to build a globally competitive region and to support our mission to increase business investment.

Indiana Department of Veteran's Affairs

Indiana Department of Veteran’s Affairs – Since its establishment in 1945, the Indiana Department of Veterans Affairs (IDVA) has remained focused on aiding and assisting “Hoosier” veterans, and qualified family members or survivors, who are eligible for benefits or advantages provided by Indiana and the U.S. government. Indiana owes a great debt to its veterans, past and present, for their personal sacrifices and dedicated service. 75 Hoosiers (1 still living) have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in testimony to their courage and sacrifices.

Visit Indiana

Visit Indiana – How do you choose what destinations to include in your next Indiana getaway? Start here with the Best of Indiana lists, as voted on by travelers just like you.

Indiana Department of Workforce Development

Indiana Department of Workforce Development – Indiana is committed to providing quality employment services to Veterans at our WorkOne Centers. Veterans go to the front of the line and each office has an onsite Veteran’s representative that assists with employment needs. All Veterans are encouraged to make contact with their local WorkOne Career Center for assistance.

Transition Time for Veterans (an interactive tool)

This interactive tool allows Veterans to estimate the preparation time required to transition from their military occupation to another one in Indiana. “Transition time,” while measured in weeks of academic, technical or vocational training, is a relative measure to provide an estimate of the relative time moving from one type of job to another. Find out more here.

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April is Tornado Awareness Month

April is Tornado Awareness Month. Do you know where to seek shelter during a tornado? Learn what to do before, during & after one hits.

Image by Jonny Lindner from Pixabay
Image by Jonny Lindner from Pixabay

Tornadoes

Tornadoes can destroy your home, your business, buildings, flip cars, and create deadly flying debris. Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air that extend from a thunderstorm to the ground. Tornadoes can:

  • Happen anytime and anywhere;
  • Bring intense winds, over 200 MPH; and
  • Look like funnels.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A TORNADO WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • If you can safely get to a sturdy building, then do so immediately.
  • Go to a safe room, basement, or storm cellar.
  • If you are in a building with no basement, then get to a small interior room on the lowest level.
  • Stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You’re safer in a low, flat location.
  • Watch out for flying debris that can cause injury or death.
  • Use your arms to protect your head and neck.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A TORNADO THREATENS

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s tornado risk. In the U.S., the Midwest and the Southeast have a greater risk for tornadoes.
  • Know the signs of a tornado, including a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud; an approaching cloud of debris; or a loud roar—similar to a freight train.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts. If your community has sirens, then become familiar with the warning tone.
  • Pay attention to weather reports. Meteorologists can predict when conditions might be right for a tornado.
  • Identify and practice going to a safe shelter in the event of high winds, such as a safe room built using FEMA criteria or a storm shelter built to ICC 500 standards. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room on the lowest level of a sturdy building.
  • Consider constructing your own safe room that meets FEMA or ICC 500 standards.

 Survive DURING

  • Immediately go to a safe location that you identified.
  • Take additional cover by shielding your head and neck with your arms and putting materials such as furniture and blankets around you.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in a vehicle.
  • If you are in a car or outdoors and cannot get to a building, cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body with a coat or blanket, if possible.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Keep listening to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, and local authorities for updated information.
  • If you are trapped, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust. Try to send a text, bang on a pipe or wall, or use a whistle instead of shouting.
  • Stay clear of fallen power lines or broken utility lines.
  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe.
  • Save your phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messaging or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear thick-soled shoes, long pants, and work gloves.

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