Now THAT’S meal prepping! Mom-of-two chops up all her vegetables for the entire YEAR

Sophie Haslett For Daily Mail Australia

 21:36 EDT, 9 April 2019

Original Article

Now THAT’S meal prepping! Mum-of-two chops up all her vegetables for the entire YEAR – including 20kg of potatoes, 15kg of carrots and 10kg of onion

  • A mum of two and ex chef showed off her impressive frozen food prep
  • The working mum jokingly said she expects it to last the family ‘the next year’
  • She included 15kg of carrot, 20kg of potatoes, 15kg of sweet potatoes and more
  • The woman said she spent $80 on wholesale veg in order to prep the food

A budget-savvy mother-of-two has showed off her impressive freezer filled with frozen vegetables, which she intends to feed her family with for the next year.

The mum and ex-chef shared a snap of her giant freezer and her chopped vegetables in zip-lock bags, writing ‘Veg prep for what feels like the next year lol’.

Included in the selection was 15 kilograms of carrot, 20 kilograms of potatoes, 15 kilograms of sweet potatoes and more.’

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She wrote in a Facebook post: ’15kg of carrot: sliced, roast chunks and chopped.

’20kg of Sebago potatoes: roast chunks, sliced for potato baked and diced for mash.

’15kg of sweet potato: roast chunks, sliced for potato bake and diced for mash.

’10kg of onion: sliced, chopped and chunks for roast, onion rings.

‘2kg of zucchini: julienne and roast chunks.’

Her freezer also included one kilo of capsicum, sliced, two pumpkins in chunks and 10 kilograms of tomatoes, which she had diced.

The woman said she bought the vegetables wholesale for a total of $80.

The freezer post was a hit with others online, who wrote comments like: ‘Now that’s being organised’ and ‘Wow’.

Some questioned how the woman managed to find the time to carry out such a meal prepping feat, and she said ‘it helps that I used to be a chef’.

The mum said the reason why she did it is because she currently has ‘six adults and two kids’ living under one roof.

‘I do it so I don’t have to waste time every night chopping up veg for dinner, as we all work and I have uni and the two kids have after school sports,’ she said.

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Others asked whether the mum had ‘pre-cooked’ any of the vegetables before putting them in the bags in the freezer.

‘None of this is pre-cooked and the roast vegetables turn out great,’ the woman replied.

‘Just need to thaw out properly so I take it all out the night before. Diced up carrot and onion and that type of stuff is for slow cooker and spaghetti etc.’

She also said that onion doesn’t smell out a freezer, provided it is kept tightly locked in a zip-lock bag.

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Some in the Facebook group have been inspired by the mum to take on extreme meal prepping.

‘Thank you for sharing,’ one person wrote.

‘I was thinking I need to meal prep on a weekend because I work a 10-hour day and travel 45 minutes to and from work.

‘I am exhausted when I get home for hubby and two adult kids. This is a great way to be organised to eat healthier, love my veggies!

‘Just add meat for the main, will save you dollar on takeout and unhealthy alternative choices.’

 

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Indianapolis Colts: The Exhibit

Indianapolis Colts: The Exhibit

Indiana Historical Society – Details HERE

450 West Ohio St. Indianapolis, IN 46202

Tel: (317) 232-1882

Mar 10, 2018 – Aug 10, 2019 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Since 1984, the Indianapolis Colts have captured the hearts and loyalties of central Indiana residents. Memorable players, inspiring coaches, heart-stopping games and two glorious stadiums have cemented the team’s place in the annals of Indianapolis history. Visit Indianapolis Colts: The Exhibit to celebrate the team while exploring football’s role in American culture through digital activities, player interviews, original artifacts, photographs and video of the Colts in action.

Discover how American football grew out of the rugby fields of Ivy League academies into the modern game loved by millions through sweeping changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Witness the Hoosier Dome and Lucas Oil Stadium’s rise into the Indianapolis skyline to redefine the city’s image as a championship town. Snap a picture with your favorite virtual Colts player and learn about their views on football, leadership and the NFL. Cast your vote for the best Colts player or the most memorable game moment and see how your choice compares to other fans. See the game through the eyes of officials by making a call on a real NFL play and find out if your decision matches the actual call. Relive the glory of the 2006 season and how the players and the coaches made it all possible. Scramble on the field as the Colts mascot Blue to juke and dodge oncoming tackles using your whole body. Explore the rise of the NFL and how it became the multibillion-dollar juggernaut it is today.

But most of all, connect with the story of the Colts and how they became a team that embodies the values, drive and heart of the city they call home.

Presented by: The Indianapolis Colts

Supported by: PLOW

April is Tornado Awareness Month

April is Tornado Awareness Month. Do you know where to seek shelter during a tornado? Learn what to do before, during & after one hits.

Image by Jonny Lindner from Pixabay
Image by Jonny Lindner from Pixabay

Tornadoes

Tornadoes can destroy your home, your business, buildings, flip cars, and create deadly flying debris. Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air that extend from a thunderstorm to the ground. Tornadoes can:

  • Happen anytime and anywhere;
  • Bring intense winds, over 200 MPH; and
  • Look like funnels.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A TORNADO WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • If you can safely get to a sturdy building, then do so immediately.
  • Go to a safe room, basement, or storm cellar.
  • If you are in a building with no basement, then get to a small interior room on the lowest level.
  • Stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You’re safer in a low, flat location.
  • Watch out for flying debris that can cause injury or death.
  • Use your arms to protect your head and neck.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A TORNADO THREATENS

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s tornado risk. In the U.S., the Midwest and the Southeast have a greater risk for tornadoes.
  • Know the signs of a tornado, including a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud; an approaching cloud of debris; or a loud roar—similar to a freight train.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts. If your community has sirens, then become familiar with the warning tone.
  • Pay attention to weather reports. Meteorologists can predict when conditions might be right for a tornado.
  • Identify and practice going to a safe shelter in the event of high winds, such as a safe room built using FEMA criteria or a storm shelter built to ICC 500 standards. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room on the lowest level of a sturdy building.
  • Consider constructing your own safe room that meets FEMA or ICC 500 standards.

 Survive DURING

  • Immediately go to a safe location that you identified.
  • Take additional cover by shielding your head and neck with your arms and putting materials such as furniture and blankets around you.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in a vehicle.
  • If you are in a car or outdoors and cannot get to a building, cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body with a coat or blanket, if possible.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Keep listening to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, and local authorities for updated information.
  • If you are trapped, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust. Try to send a text, bang on a pipe or wall, or use a whistle instead of shouting.
  • Stay clear of fallen power lines or broken utility lines.
  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe.
  • Save your phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messaging or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear thick-soled shoes, long pants, and work gloves.

Associated Content

 

Purchases that end up costing you

©Shutterstock
Alan Jones 
Researching prices and finding deals can be a time-consuming process for many adults, which makes responsible spending a burden. While some big-ticket items can be rewarding, some bad purchases just won’t justify the price over time, no matter how much you try to rationalize the decision.
Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels
Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

 

Spring Weather Safety

Spring has sprung! As wild spring weather approaches, be sure you know your risks and get prepared. Learn more from the National Weather Service: http://bit.ly/2JLhLU3

 

tornado-overpass-thumbtornado-emergency

 

 

IMPD to Host Community Listening Sessions As Part of Body Worn Camera Study

Beginning next week, the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD) will host a series of community listening sessions aimed at gathering feedback on a draft policy for body worn cameras. The listening sessions were first announced by Mayor Joe Hogsett and Chief Bryan Roach on February 4, when they laid out the community-and stakeholder-driven feasibility study that will seek input from both residents and rank-and-file officers in addition to a technology pilot period.

The feasibility study of body worn cameras will include an extensive community engagement process that kicks off with the community listening sessions and also includes a secure, web-based survey sponsored, created, and maintained by the IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA). Residents can access the survey here, which will be used to garner the community’s opinions on body-worn cameras, the technology used during the study period, and other related factors. At a later date a second round of community listening sessions will be announced to allow IUPUI SPEA to share survey results directly with community members.

280px-Indianapolis_Metropolitan_Police_Department_(logo)

The study will also include a pilot of body worn camera technology. Several vendor technologies will be tested by the officers who serve in the busies shift on the largest districts – all beat officers and supervisors on North, East, and Southeast District middle shift. This is a second, larger pilot of body worn camera technology in Indianapolis, but the first time the community will take part in the assessment.

Residents can access the survey here: Survey

A community listening session will be held in each IMPD district during the first half of March. The schedule can be found below:

Southeast District March 4 at 6:00 pm Southeast Community Services 901 Shelby

Downtown District March 5 at 5:30 pm City Way YMCA 430 S. Alabama

Northwest District March 7 at 6:00 pm International Market Coalition 3685 Commercial

Southwest District March 11 at 6:00 pm Friendship Missionary Baptist Church 1301 Goodlet

North District March 12 at 7:00 pm Zion Hope Baptist Church 5950 E 46th

East District March 14 at 6:00 pm Eastern Star Baptist Church, J229 – 2nd Floor of Jewel Conference Center, use north entrance 5750 E 30th

Original Article

If you’ve got it, we protect it.

If you've got it, we protect it
Scott Lynch Agency www.lynchagency.com

Scott Lynch Agency

 

Indoors getting stale? Try these 10 Plants for cleaning indoor air.

Home closed up for winter and rooms smelling stale? Try these 10 plants to clean your home’s air and brighten your mood.

english ivy

  • English Ivy (Hedera Helix) – Excellent for removing harmful chemicals found in the home. It can grow in full shade to full sun.
  • Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea Seifrizii) – Prefers part sun or shade. Good for removing harmful elements such as benzene and formaldehyde.
  • Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema Modestum) – Thrives n low to medium light. Can be toxic to pets.
  • Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera Jamesonii) – Prefers warm temperatures. Removes harmful elements and has beautiful flowers.
  • Dragon Tree (Dracaena Marginata) – Great office plant. Can tolerate low light.
  • Mother-in-Law’s Tongue (Sansevieria Trifasciata ‘Laurentii’) – Great for beginners. Prefers little to no water at all.
  • Pot Mum (Chrysanthemum Morifolium) – Colorful addition to the home.
  • Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’) – Fights toxic gases such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Can be mildly toxic to pets and humans, wash your hands after touching.
  • Spider Plant (Chlorophytum Comosum ‘Vittatum’) – Thrives in bright, indirect light.
  • Mass Cane/Corn Plant (Dracaena Fragrans ‘Massangeana’) – One of the most popular varieties of Dracaenas for its lovely foliage that ranges from green to yellow.

Scott Lynch Agency

(317) 886-0081

Need a Home or Auto Insurance Quote for Indiana?

Looking for a simple and easy way to get a competitive quote on your home and/or auto insurance? Visit us on line now for your quote – Scott Lynch Agency representing SafeCo.

What You Need to Know About Lightning Safety

by Erie Insurance on 

This week marks Lightning Safety Awareness Week. Though disasters like hurricanes tend to get more attention during the summer months, it’s important to know how to stay safe from lightning. That’s because lightning presents serious dangers to both people and property.

Lightning safety and people
Lightning can occur during any time of the year, but lightning casualties are highest during summer. July is generally the month with the most lightning. Lightning strikes often occur in the afternoon. Two-thirds of all lightning casualties occur between noon and 6 p.m. According to the National Weather Service, here are some more interesting facts:

  • Males are five times more likely than females to be struck by lightning; around 85 percent of lightning fatalities are men.
  • People aged 15 to 34 account for almost half of all lightning strike victims (41 percent).
  • About one-third (32 percent) of lightning injuries occur indoors.


Lightning safety and property
From 2007 to 2011, local U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 22,600 fires per year that were started by lightning according to the National Fire Protection Association. These fires caused an average of nine civilian deaths and $451 million in direct property damage per year. Home fires accounted for 19 percent of the lightning fires. Fires in nonresidential structures, including businesses and other non-residential properties, accounted for 7 percent. Vehicle fires accounted for 1 percent. The remaining 73 percent were in outdoor and unclassified properties.

How to avoid lightning
There are important things to know when it comes to how to avoid lightning. Once you hear that first clap of thunder, remember to:

  • Postpone outdoor activities.
  • Heed the 30/30 Lightning Safety Rule: Go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • Get inside a home, building or automobiles with a hard top (not a convertible). Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
  • Remember, rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. However, the steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal.
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.
  • Unplug any electronic equipment before the storm arrives.

You are not safe anywhere outside. Run to a safe building or vehicle when you first hear thunder, see lightning or observe dark threatening clouds developing overhead. Stay inside until 30 minutes after you hear the last clap of thunder. Do not shelter under trees.

If it’s not possible to get indoors or in a vehicle, these actions may reduce your chances of being struck by lightning:

  • Avoid open fields, the top of a hill or a ridge top.
  • Stay away from tall, isolated trees or other tall objects. If you are in a forest, stay near a lower stand of trees.
  • If you are camping in an open area, set up camp in a valley, ravine or other low area. Remember, a tent offers NO protection from lightning.
  • Stay away from water, wet items (such as ropes) and metal objects (such as fences and poles). Water and metal are excellent conductors of electricity. The current from a lightning flash will easily travel for long distances.
  • The vast majority of lightning injuries and deaths on boats occur on small boats with NO cabin. It is crucial to listen to weather information when you are boating. If thunderstorms are in the forecast, do not go out. If you are out and cannot get back to land and safety, drop an anchor and get as low as possible. Large boats with cabins, especially those with lightning protection systems properly installed, or metal marine vessels, are relatively safe. Remember to stay inside the cabin and away from any metal surfaces. Stay off the radio unless it is an emergency.

When it comes to how to avoid lightning, you should also take precautions once you’re indoors:

  • Avoid contact with corded phones.
  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords. If you plan to unplug any electronic equipment, do so well before the storm arrives.
  • Avoid contact with plumbing. Do not wash your hands, take a shower, wash dishes or do laundry.
  • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.
  • Do not lie on concrete floors and do not lean against concrete walls.
  • Unplug electrical equipment

It’s important to prepare for natural and weather disasters. It’s also important to make sure you’re covered if something happens to your vehicle or home during a storm. Connect with the Scott Lynch Agency to make sure you have the coverage that’s right for you.