Boarding the Bus

by Erie Insurance on 

When the big yellow bus swings around the corner and nears the corner bus stop, it can be an exciting moment for both kids and parents. It marks the real start of the new school year.

Every year, U.S. school buses carry 25 million children to and from school, according to the American School Bus Council. School buses also boast an impressive safety record: School-bus involved crashes amount to less than one percent of all fatal crashes in the U.S., according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In fact, the NHTSA says that the bigger risk to student safety isn’t riding the bus, but getting on and off the bus. Before the exciting day arrives, do a quick review of bus safety tips with your children.

Be aware of cars. Aside from your kids heading off to school, morning is a busy time of day in the neighborhood, with grownups racing out the door to work. Teach kids to stay on the sidewalk and never cross an intersection until the car is stopped, they make eye contact with the driver and no other cars are approaching.

Safe waiting. While waiting for the bus, kids should stay at least three giant steps back from the curb. Because of the bus stop’s proximity to the street, discourage kids from horseplay and running games too close to the street.

Don’t cut it short. When young kids are running late, they can quickly forget the safety rules and run right into the street without looking for cars. Get kids into the habit of leaving five minutes before the bus’s scheduled arrival. In fact, during the first week of school, it doesn’t hurt to give them a bigger cushion of time because schedules can vary until the driver gets the route down.

Boarding safely: Everyone loves to grab their favorite seat. But it’s more important to board the bus safely. The safest way to do this is to stay back on the curb and not approach the bus until it comes to a complete halt and the door swings open.

For additional family/business safety, visit Scott Lynch Agency

Keep kids safe with these 5 tips to prevent heatstroke in cars

JUL 31, 2017 | BY ROSALIE L. DONLONDENNY JACOB

Summer is a favorite time of the year for many with warm, sunny days. But it’s important to remember extremely hot summer temperatures can be dangerous and even deadly.

During periods of elevated temperature, your body must work more intensely to maintain its internal temperature of 98.6 degrees, leading to the threat of dehydration, among other things. Beyond the risks to people, extreme heat increases a number of exposures. For example, vehicles can break down if there aren’t enough fluids to keep the car cool and functional as it reacts to the increased heat.

Of the numerous risks that can occur with increased heat, a heatstroke is often overlooked. Children, especially those under a year old, are at risk because their body’s temperature rises 3 to 5 times faster than an adult’s, and they’re often too young to alert others for help.

In the span of 10 minutes, a car can heat up by 20 degrees — enough to kill a child left alone in a vehicle. On July 31, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) will tweet every 15 minutes for 24 hours to raise awareness about the dangers of heatstroke. You can follow the conversation through NHTSA’s Twitter page and participate using the hashtag #HeatstrokeKills.

The risks of vehicular heatstroke

Vehicular heatstroke happens when a child is left or trapped inside a car or truck. As NHTSA explains, the temperature inside a vehicle can quickly rise high enough to kill a child—even when it doesn’t feel that hot outside. Understanding how and why these tragedies happen is the key to protecting our children. In 54% of cases, the child was forgotten by the caregiver. In 28% of cases, children got into the vehicle on their own.

High body temperatures can cause permanent injury or even death. It begins when the core body temperature reaches about 104 degrees and the thermoregulatory system is overwhelmed. A core temperature of about 107 degrees is lethal.

Regardless of the temperature, heatstrokes pose a risk at any given time; they can occur in temperatures as low as 57 degrees. Heatstroke fatalities have occurred even in vehicles parked in shaded areas and when the air temperature was 80 degrees Fahrenheit or less — rolling down a window does little keep a vehicle cool.

The warning signs of a heatstroke can vary, but may include: red, hot, and moist or dry skin; no sweating; a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse; a throbbing headache; dizziness; nausea; confusion; being grouchy or acting strangely.

Follow these five tips from NHTSA to keep children safe from vehicular heatstroke:

Look before you lock

Get into the routine of always checking the back seats of your vehicle before you lock it and walk away. It sounds unthinkable that you’d forget your child in the back seat, but if the child is asleep and you’re distracted or in a rush to get somewhere, it does happen.

Have a gentle reminder

Keep a stuffed animal or another memento in your child’s car seat when it’s empty, and move it to the front seat as a visual reminder when your child is in the back seat. Or place your phone, briefcase or purse in the back seat when traveling with your child.

Do a routine check

If someone else is driving your child, or your daily routine has been altered, always check to make sure your child has arrived safely. Set a reminder on your phone to call and check in.

Keep track of your car keys

Keep your vehicle locked and keep your keys out of reach; nearly 3 in 10 heatstroke deaths happen when an unattended child gains access to a vehicle.

If you have a newer model car that has a keyless entry, check with the vehicle’s manufacturer on ways to keep children from getting into the car unsupervised.

Act to save a life

You should act if you see a child alone in a vehicle. Call law enforcement immediately, and free the child from the vehicle to protect that child’s life. Don’t be afraid to break a window if necessary.

Original Article

Marion County fireworks ordinance to take effect

Marion County fireworks ordinance to take effect

Chris Bavender from Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department · 15 Jun 16

Indianapolis – The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Homeland Security Bureau reminds Marion County residents that the Marion County fireworks ordinance will be in effect starting June 28.

Hours for fireworks use on and around July 4 in Marion County are:

• 5 p.m. until two hours after sunset June 28 through July 3
• 10 a.m. to midnight on July 4
• 5 p.m. until two hours after sunset July 5 through July 9

Under Indiana law, you must be at least 18-years-old to buy fireworks and someone who is 18 or older must be present when fireworks are being set off.

If you are not lighting fireworks on your own property, make sure you have permission from the person who lives there.

Violations of the ordinance are subject to the following fines:

• A $100 fine for the first offense in any 12 month period
• A minimum of $500 for the second offense in any 12 month period
• Up to $2,500 for the third and subsequent offenses in any 12 month period

The complete Indianapolis/Marion County ordinance concerning fireworks is available at http://bit.ly/28FiFEK

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Direct Gas Grill Lines

by Nancy Daniel on May 23, 2017

When my husband and I first decided to go with a natural gas grill that hooked up directly to our home gas system, we were thrilled to say farewell to propane canisters and the hassle of refilling them. But a 600° overnight mistake has me wondering if it was such a great idea.

We had family visiting and,after enjoying a delicious steak dinner, my husband, the grill master, failed to turn off the grill. This was after he had turned it up to high to burn off the steak remnants left on the grill.

The next morning as we readied for a day of boating, my sister-in-law went outside to retrieve something and made the discovery. The grill was so hot the siding on our house behind it was melting.

I shudder to think what might have happened if she hadn’t gone out there and we had left the grill on all day long . We might have had a serious fire with our pet dog and cat at home to face it alone. So, what are the pros and cons of connecting a grill to your natural gas line?

Advantages of natural gas grilling

  • You’ll never run out of fuel — even during your biggest barbecue (unless you forget to pay the gas company).
  • Natural gas is less expensive than propane.
  • You no longer have to lug heavy propane tanks back and forth for filling.
  • Natural gas is classified as a greenhouse gas, so it’s environmentally friendly.

Disadvantages of natural gas grilling

  • The location of your grill is fixed, so you won’t be able to move it.
  • Professional installation is required, and the initial cost of the gas plumbing can be expensive.
  • Natural gas grills are more expensive than propane grills.

What to know before you go for it

If you decide to go with a natural gas grill connected to your home gas system, there are some things you should know before you make your grill purchase.

First, natural gas grills and propane grills are not the same thing, so be sure to shop for the right type.

Some areas require a permit. If you live in a community that has a homeowners’ association, certain types of grills may be subject to restrictions. So you’ll want to check on these things.  Hopefully your locale only requires that you install a quick connect shut-off valve at the house.

Speaking of the installation, there are a couple of different methods of hooking up your grill to the gas line. The safest is with a gas plug safety quick disconnect.  Your best bet is to hire a natural gas plumber to do this for you.

Time to (safely) fire up the grill

According to the 27th annual Weber GrillWatchTM Survey, 75 percent of Americans will fire up the grill for a Memorial Day cookout this year. Regardless of your fuel source, be sure to follow these grill safety tips from the National Fire Protection Association:

  • Only grill outdoors—don’t move the grill into the garage or on the porch when it rains.
  • Position the grill well away from the house and deck railings and out from under eaves.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill clean, removing grease buildup from the grills and the trays below.
  • Never leave a hot grill unattended.
  • Turn off the supply of gas to the grill when it’s not in use.

And one final safety tip, learned the (almost) hard way: Be sure your home’s grill master turns the grill off before presenting his or her delicious char-grilled fare!

Original Article: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Direct Gas Grill Lines

This story was originally published on August 24, 2016. It was updated with new information.

Video: Helpful Tips to Keep Kids Safe on Road Trips

Video: Family Road Trip: Car Seat Safety Checklist

Millions of Americans will take to the roads this summer. In addition to mapping out your route, packing snacks and making sure your car emergency kit is fully stocked, you’ll also want to think about how to keep kids safe on the road trip.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that nearly half of all child car seats are installed incorrectly. Not completely confident that your child’s car seat is safely installed? Then watch the short video above. It has helpful correct installation and more.

Also check out our top tips on buying and installing a child safety seat. Knowing your littlest passengers are safe gives you peace of mind so you can move on to other orders of business—like how to keep kids entertained during that long drive. (Good luck!)

For your auto insurance quote visit: Scott Lynch Agency


This video originally appeared on the CJ Pony Parts Blog.

by Erie Insurance on June 13, 2017

SHIFT for Teen Drivers

Parents of teen drivers (or soon to be drivers) – Students who participate in Shift can earn points by watching, sharing and creating content. They can win up to $10,000 for their school and up to $1,500 for themselves in Erie Insurance’s Shift contest! Encourage your teen to take the safe driving pledge and compete in this year’s Shift contest.

Visit jointheshift.org for more info.

1st Place School won $10,000, 1st Place Student won $1,500.00

ATTENTION ALL INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS!!!!

How would you like to win like this:
 
“On January 13, John S. Battle was presented with a $10,000 check for taking first place in the “Join the Shift” contest sponsored by Erie Insurance. Join the Shift is a competition between schools and students that encourages teens to practice and share messages about safe driving. More than a contest, it’s a movement of young drivers who are ready and willing to make a change that is long overdue: to reduce the high number of teen injuries and deaths that happen on the road every year. JSB students participated by completing weekly challenges, making videos, and participating in online polls.” – http://jsbhs.wcs.k12.va.us/content/join-shift-sponsored-erie-insurance
Visit Join the SHIFT Org and sign up the top student won $1500.00!